Non-QM Products; Mortgage Mergers Roll On; QE Still Influencing Rates

Economic doldrums? Probably not – but there is always someone out there claiming dire straits are right around the corner. A CNBC survey of Wall Street experts finds over 96% do not More »

Key Yankees player out indefinitely with painful injury

Add Aaron Judge to the growing list of New York Yankees stars battling an injury. The slugging outfielder was forced to leave Saturday’s game against the Kansas City Royals after suffering an oblique injury. Yankees manager Aaron Boone More »

MBS Day Ahead: Bonds Successfully Predict Chinese Rebound

Over the years, there have been more times than I can count where the financial media has mistakenly assigned some significance to news or events in China.  The past week has had More »

MBS Day Ahead: Bonds Successfully Predict Chinese Rebound

Over the years, there have been more times than I can count where the financial media has mistakenly assigned some significance to news or events in China.  The past week has had More »

8 things you probably never knew about Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II is the longest-lived and longest-reigning British monarch in history. She’s ruled over the United Kingdom as a constitutional monarch since her 1953 coronation. The queen and her family are More »

Non-QM Products; Mortgage Mergers Roll On; QE Still Influencing Rates

Economic doldrums? Probably not – but there is always someone out there claiming dire straits are right around the corner. A CNBC survey of Wall Street experts finds over 96% do not anticipate a recession by summer 2020, 70% are optimistic about the economy, and 30% have a neutral outlook. Fitch Ratings said there are no signs of recession currently but noted that global growth was sharply deteriorating. Fitch sees relatively strong US GDP growth as a positive and expects China will start stabilizing soon. And a survey of economists by the Wall Street Journal found that 57% thought the next rate increase by the Fed wouldn’t happen until September or later. This number is up from 35% in the February survey and 13% in the January survey. Overall, 18% of economists believe the Fed will not raise rates any more this year and that its next move will be to cut rates. This is up from 10% in February and 4% in January.

Lender Products and Services

Non-QM has arrived and is now spreading to virtually every lender and broker in the country, and originators are asking, how do I go about sourcing these clients in this high growth marketplace? Well, Deephaven is here to help! Deephaven Mortgage, a leader in the Non-QM market, and one of the first – established in 2012 – continues to shine the light on Non-QM through its products, processes, and innovative technology, and through education and ideas on how to source clients and build a Non-QM business. To find out more about how Non-QM can help you grow your business, please Deephaven’s wholesale or Deephaven’s correspondent group.

Is your call center consistently delivering high quality customer interactions? Sourcepoint, formerly ISGN Solutions, can streamline your call center operations to help you better manage changing call volumes and reduce costs. Sourcepoint’s next generation Contact Center and Collections services help loan servicers better communicate with customers, when and how they want, by voice, email, chat, social, text or survey. Its omnichannel contact center solution FirstCustomerIntelligence optimizes people, processes and operations by pairing customers with qualified agents and monitoring agent-customer conversations for constant improvement. Sourcepoint has also invested heavily in compliance and licensing to ensure your peace of mind. With centers across the U.S. and around the world, Sourcepoint offers the right languages, geographies and time zones to help drive the best customer satisfaction and return on investment. So, if you want to scale in sync with fluctuating call volumes, improve agent productivity and debt recovery, and ensure compliance, consider Sourcepoint.

Stearns Wholesale announced the release of a powerful new feature in SNAP 2.0 that makes it possible for brokers to calculate borrowers’ income. Brokers simply input a few docs into the Calculate My Income Tool in SNAP 2.0, hit submit and Stearns notifies you when the income is processed in a short, easy to read, breakdown. Brokers can use this tool to help qualify more borrowers under Stearns’ vast array of product options.  For 30 years, Stearns has empowered their brokers with tools to help them work smarter, more efficiently and close more loans. Learn more about this tool by watching this quick video.

Sierra Pacific Mortgage is hosting a free Market Power webinar on Sierra Elite. This jumbo product is so hot and can help you grow your business. Register for Thursday, April 25 at 1:00 pm PDT. You will learn about some of the amazing features of this program and how it can help your next borrower purchase up to $3.0 million or one who needs a cash-out loan up to $2.0 million. This is the loan program for them, including self-employed borrowers. Register now.

Simplify your underwriting process with Loan Product Advisor® asset and income modeler (AIM). Through the expertise of third-party service providers, AIM automates the manual processes of assessing borrower assets and income. AIM reduces the burden of traditional documentation, speeds up the loan origination process and helps you close loans faster. Freddie Mac is working hard to bring you solutions that create efficiencies for your business and improve the borrower experience – giving you a competitive edge. These capabilities are available now. Gain greater efficiency in your underwriting processes with AIM – get The Freddie EdgeSM.

Hey Loan Officer! Don’t you wish you could have an underwriter on speed dial to answer all of your loan application questions on the spot, 24/7? What if your underwriter could be shrunk to fit in your pocket for when you need him? What if I told you that is possible? Well, not literally… we are not into shrinking people. We are into creating software that provides loan officers with underwriting knowledge at the tip of their fingers. The Rule Tool was made to make your job easier by providing agency guidelines that have been transcribed into easy to understand terms. Just select the agency you need, type in a keyword, and The Rule Tool will give you the rule, tips and more! It’s also updated daily by our underwriting experts. No more wasting time searching for answers. Get answers quick so you can get loans approved! Sign up now!

Capital Markets

Remember Quantitative Easing, in its various forms? At its peak the Fed had added $1.8 trillion to its balance sheet. The Fed’s quantitative easing stimulus efforts employed to support the economy, in which the Fed stated it would continue to support the economy by increasing its purchase activity of fixed-income securities per month, split between MBS and US Treasuries caused MBS prices to rally, sending mortgage rates lower and lower.

Those new highs in MBS prices meant that investors were taking on more and more premium risk. Because of the additional prepayment risk, as rates drifted lower, investors were willing to pay more for “call protection,” i.e., loans that don’t pay off early. Many investors prefer to hedge their specified pools with To Be Announced (TBA) securities, so as long as the interest they earn on the long (specified) position is greater than the cost of maintaining the short (TBA) position, it is in their favor to continue to do so.

But now the balance sheet is being allowed to run off, up to $50 billion per month. As the Fed slows and ultimately ends quantitative easing, investors could see the potential for lower dollar prices and higher mortgage rates, unless demand can be found from another source. This will diminish the need for prepayment protection, putting further pressure on call-protected specified pools.

Capital markets folks know that for over 8 years the Fed has been the “trash heap” of the mortgage market: the worst of the worst pools were delivered to them. This means high WAC (weighted average coupons), fast paying, poorly serviced pools ended up on their balance sheet. Fortunately this isn’t a huge issue as it greatly improved liquidity the mortgage market, which helped to elevate rolls. Now that they are no longer the buyer, anything that is in existence currently in the market, or that will be created in the future, will have to go somewhere else, creating less demand for the roll and increasing the demand for high quality pools.

Into the end of 2018 we saw this come to fruition, where rolls faded across almost all coupons and good clean bonds evaporated of the street. While some of this had to do with year-end constraints of dealer balance sheets, one would expect this trend to continue. As a caveat, even if the Fed were to change their stance on balance sheet normalization, there is chatter that this would likely be in the form of purchasing Treasuries rather than mortgages like they had in the past.

Looking at yesterday’s bond market, U.S. Treasuries spent yesterday surrendering their slim gains from Monday, including the 10-year closing at 2.59% despite the release of a worse than expected Industrial Production report for March showed continued weakness in manufacturing output and markets received better than expected economic sentiment readings in Germany and the euro zone. Separately, the People’s Bank of China injected liquidity on Tuesday, representing the first open market operation in 19 sessions. And in news of interest to the mortgage market, homebuilder sentiment rose to a six-month high but is still down versus a year ago as home builders navigate a shortage of construction workers and buildable lots putting upward pressure on housing costs and affordability. Finally, a “significant minority” of ECB policymakers at the last ECB meeting expressed doubt about the likelihood of a rebound in economic activity during the second half of the year.

Today’s domestic calendar kicked off with mortgage applications for the week ending April 12 (headline -3.5%, but purchases hit their highest level in 9 years!). Next up will be international trade for February with the deficit expected to widen, followed by wholesale trade for February. At 2pm, the Fed releases the Beige Book in preparation for the April 30-May 1 FOMC meeting. We also have three Fed speakers scheduled: Philadelphia’s Harker; St. Louis’ Bullard; and New York Fed SVP and Deputy SOMA Manager Logan. We begin today with agency MBS prices down a few ticks (32nds) versus last night’s close and the 10-year yielding 2.60%.

 

MA

Mergers and acquisitions continue, big and small, involving non-depositories, banks, credit unions and other financial institutions. Things picked up in 2018, and are expected to continue in 2019, for many reasons. Let’s see what’s going on.

In Mortgage Land, rumors were laid to rest yesterday when Home Point Financial Corp. announced the acquisition of the wholesale division of Platinum Mortgage Inc. This includes both Platinum’s sales team and its’ Madison, AL based operations group. “Platinum has built a strong wholesale lending footprint focused on the customer experience. We are excited about the opportunity to integrate the Platinum team into Home Point’s rapidly growing wholesale business.” said Willie Newman, Home Point Financial President and CEO. “Having been in business for over 20 years, I’ve always been committed to my broker clients. I decided to partner with Home Point, because they share the same level of commitment.” said Terry Clark, CEO of Platinum Mortgage. (The STRATMOR Group served as exclusive advisor to Platinum on the transaction, which closed on April 15th.)

Brokers were told that, “Platinum will continue to close out all your loans currently in the Platinum pipeline through May 31, 2019. April 15th was the last day to submit a new/unlocked loan to Platinum. Submit locked loans with Platinum until April 30. Lock all loans that are submitted but NOT locked till April 30. The last day to close a loan in Platinum pipeline will be May 31, 2019.”

Garth Graham, Senior Partner at the STRATMOR Group, observed, “The amazing part about this deal is that they bought the sales, and hired nearly all the people, including Ops. The staff in Alabama did a good job, at a low cost, and thus were very beneficial for the buyer. We helped Platinum with the process, and they had a number of options for sale, and picked Home Point because of the long-time commitment to the channel.”

Colony Bank will be acquiring Planters First Bank’s mortgage business. Jesse Kight, who is currently president of PFB Mortgage, will become SVP of Colony and president of its mortgage division, and Teresa Gainey will become group VP and director of mortgage operations for Colony. PFB Mortgage originated more than $100 million in mortgages last year,

In depository banking land, we had some announcements in recent weeks. FirstBank ($5.1B, TN) will record a $2.5mm restructuring and severance charge and sell its third-party wholesale mortgage origination business to Renasant Bank ($12.9B, MS). In Florida Power Financial CU ($655mm) will acquire TransCapital Bank ($204mm). Up in Illinois Midland States Bank ($5.6B) will acquire HomeStar Bank ($375mm) for about $9.9mm in stock (100%) or 0.95x tangible book. Glacier Bank ($12.1B, MT) will acquire Heritage Bank of Nevada ($830mm, NV) for about $240.7mm in cash (7%) and stock (93%) or 2.39x tangible book.

 

Article source: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/channels/pipelinepress/04172019-quantitative-easing.aspx

Kelly Stafford, wife of Lions QB, returns home after 12 hours of brain surgery

Easter Sunday came with some very happy news from the family of Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford.

Kelly Stafford, Matthew’s wife and mother to their three daughters, announced through Instagram that she had returned home after undergoing a lengthy surgery to remove a brain tumor that had been found a month earlier.

Kelly Stafford’s good news


Per Stafford, the surgery was scheduled to take six hours, but actually lasted 12 after an abnormal vein was found. In a happy development Stafford attributes to God’s work, her surgeon had actually written a paper on the same type of abnormal vein and knew how to overcome it.

Stafford also shared a video of her slowly walking with some guidance back to her room. She says she is now back home and “learning my new norm.” That last part could mean any number of things due to the complex nature of brain surgery, though a surgeon who spoke to the Detroit Free Press said hearing loss is common from this sort of surgery.

Hearing loss was one of the side effects Stafford admitted she was afraid of when announcing she needed the surgery:

I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t completely terrified of brain surgery. I am. I am terrified of them opening my head, I’m terrified of losing my hearing, I’m terrified of losing facial function, I’m terrified of far worse things that could happen and I’m terrified that I won’t take the time I need to recover because the guilt I might feel of being absent from my kids for too long.

Hopefully, it all gets better from here.

More from Yahoo Sports:

Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/04/22/kelly-stafford-wife-of-lions-qb-returns-home-after-12-hours-of-brain-surgery/23715291/

Rep. Seth Moulton is latest Democrat to enter 2020 field

WASHINGTON — Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., became the latest Democrat to enter the 2020 presidential race Monday, launching a presidential campaign focused on national security.

A 40-year-old Marine combat veteran who earned a Bronze Star in Iraq, Moulton’s stature has been rising since he won a seat in Congress in 2014 by defeating a long-time Democratic incumbent in a primary.

Moulton may be best known, however, for his opposition to Speaker Nancy Pelosi. His call for new leadership in internal House elections early this year cost him some support back home in his congressional district north of Boston, which includes Salem and the famous fishing town of Gloucester. He later came around to support Pelosi.

Moulton has been traveling to early primary and caucus states as he prepared for a presidential run. This week, he’ll visit all four of them again and participate in a service project in each, something he has long made a part of his campaigns.

Moulton is the 19th candidate to enter the very crowded Democratic field. He’s hardly a household name and may struggle to stand out from the eight other male candidates.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts)

(Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images) 

Julian Castro, former Mayor of San Antonio and a former secretary of Housing and Urban Development

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-California)

(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

John Delaney, former Maryland congressman

(AP Photo/Nick Wass, File)

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-New York)

(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Richard Ojeda, former West Virginia senator and military veteran

(MICHAEL MATHES/AFP/Getty Images)

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii)

(AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

Andrew Yang, founder of Venture for America

(Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Pete Buttigeig, Mayor of South Bend, Indiana

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Howard Schultz, Former Starbucks CEO

(Photo by Elaine Thompson/AP)

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont)

(Photo by: Andrew Harnik/Associated Press)

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld (R)

(Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)

Sen. Cory Booker (D-New Jersey)

(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper (D)

(Photo by Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota)

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Up Next

See Gallery




 

Politics

But his advisers think the primary contest is still wide open and believe voters want a fresh, younger voice who is willing to break with their own party if need be. And his team argues he can carve a place for himself in the field by focusing on national security, which none of the other candidates have prioritized thus far.

He’s used his position in the House to recruit and support veteran candidacies with his PAC, which contributed $4.3 million in last year’s midterms.

Unlike most other young veterans in politics, Moulton joined the military before the September 11 terror attacks and led one of the first platoons to enter Baghdad during the initial invasion.

The other veterans in the 2020 field are Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii.

Moulton holds three degrees from Harvard — including an MBA and masters of public policy — and attended the elite Phillips Academy prep school in Andover, Mass.

Ideologically, Moulton is progressive on many issues, coming out for the Green New Deal and abolishing the Electoral College and Senate filibuster before some other candidates. But he’s temperamentally considered more moderate.

Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/04/22/rep-seth-moulton-is-latest-democrat-to-enter-2020-field/23715292/

American Hemp Ventures Inc. (AMHV: Pink Limited) | Annual Report

{“timestamp”:1555934132787,”status”:412,”error”:”Precondition Failed”,”exception”:”org.springframework.web.method.annotation.MethodArgumentTypeMismatchException”,”message”:”For input string: “content””,”path”:”/company/financial-report/content”}

Article source: http://www.otcmarkets.com/financialReportViewer?symbol=AMHV&id=217297

Key Yankees player out indefinitely with painful injury

Add Aaron Judge to the growing list of New York Yankees stars battling an injury.

The slugging outfielder was forced to leave Saturday’s game against the Kansas City Royals after suffering an oblique injury. Yankees manager Aaron Boone told reporters on Sunday that Judge suffered a “pretty significant strain.”

Judge suffered the injury on his sixth-inning single. He was clearly in pain as he ran down the first-base line.

He was immediately tended to by the Yankees athletic trainer and almost as quickly was removed from the game.

New York officially added Judge to the 10-day injury list ahead of Sunday’s finale against the Royals.

Earlier in the game, Judge slugged his fifth home run of the season.

The list of injured Yankees is extensive. The team is already without ace Luis Severino, reliever Dellin Betances and a whole lineup worth of key hitters. That includes Giancarlo StantonGary SánchezMiguel AndújarDidi GregoriusGreg BirdAaron Hicks and Troy Tulowitzki.

The good news is the Yankees are on track to get Sanchez back this week, but needless to say, they’ll will miss Judge for as long as he’s sidelined.

Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/04/21/key-yankees-player-out-indefinitely-with-painful-injury/23715102/

Coachella 2019: All the best photos from Kanye West’s Easter Sunday Service

Kanye West brought his Sunday Service to Coachella on Easter Sunday, and the results were spectacular.

The two-and-a-half hour event featured a full gospel choir and band that performed at the top of a hill as thousands of festival-goers watched from down below. West and a variety of special guests that included Teyana Taylor, DMX and Chance the Rapper led the musical performance through a variety of gospel songs and West’s hits, including “Jesus Walks,” “Power” and a new song called “Water.”

SEE ALSO: All of the best celebrity sightings from Coachella 2019

Also on-hand, of course, were some V.I.P. guests: the Kardashian-Jenner family. Kim, Khloe, Kendall, Kylie, Penelope, Mason and North were among the family members in attendance on Sunday morning. At one point, the family — dressed in color-coordinated off-white outfits — ran up the hill to briefly join West at the center of the event.

See the best photos from Kanye West’s Sunday Service at Coachella:

Up Next

See Gallery




Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/entertainment/2019/04/21/coachella-2019-kanye-west-sunday-service-photos/23715152/

MBS Day Ahead: Bonds Successfully Predict Chinese Rebound

Over the years, there have been more times than I can count where the financial media has mistakenly assigned some significance to news or events in China.  The past week has had its moments in that regard, but this time around, the Chinese economy is undoubtedly in play as a market mover.  Either that, or it’s being used as cover for traders to strategically back-fill the post-Fed rally that begin on March 20th–something that was ultimately accomplished this morning.

2019-4-17 open2

Overnight economic data in China was this week’s focus in terms of potential market movers.  Chinese GDP came out at 6.4 vs 6.3 forecast (6.4 previously).  Industrial output rose by 8.5% versus a 5.9% forecast. And Retail Sales ticked up to 8.7% from 8.2%.  All of the above data points were released at 10pm ET, and had obvious effects on stocks and bonds.

2019-4-17 open

Notably absent from the chart above is some indicator for Chinese markets (i.e. Chinese stocks or bonds).  Interestingly enough, we’re not seeing the same reaction there, but that’s actually not a total surprise.  We’ll talk about why that is on MBS Live this morning, but the short version is that US markets aren’t so much trading the evolution of the Chinese economy as they are trading the Fed’s expected reaction to it.

Article source: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/mortgage_rates/blog/907751.aspx

MBS Day Ahead: Bonds Successfully Predict Chinese Rebound

Over the years, there have been more times than I can count where the financial media has mistakenly assigned some significance to news or events in China.  The past week has had its moments in that regard, but this time around, the Chinese economy is undoubtedly in play as a market mover.  Either that, or it’s being used as cover for traders to strategically back-fill the post-Fed rally that begin on March 20th–something that was ultimately accomplished this morning.

2019-4-17 open2

Overnight economic data in China was this week’s focus in terms of potential market movers.  Chinese GDP came out at 6.4 vs 6.3 forecast (6.4 previously).  Industrial output rose by 8.5% versus a 5.9% forecast. And Retail Sales ticked up to 8.7% from 8.2%.  All of the above data points were released at 10pm ET, and had obvious effects on stocks and bonds.

2019-4-17 open

Notably absent from the chart above is some indicator for Chinese markets (i.e. Chinese stocks or bonds).  Interestingly enough, we’re not seeing the same reaction there, but that’s actually not a total surprise.  We’ll talk about why that is on MBS Live this morning, but the short version is that US markets aren’t so much trading the evolution of the Chinese economy as they are trading the Fed’s expected reaction to it.

Article source: http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/mortgage_rates/blog/907751.aspx

8 things you probably never knew about Queen Elizabeth II

  • Queen Elizabeth II is the longest-lived and longest-reigning British monarch in history.
  • She’s ruled over the United Kingdom as a constitutional monarch since her 1953 coronation.
  • The queen and her family are frequently in the news — but there are some facts about Queen Elizabeth II that might fly under the radar.

Queen Elizabeth II has had quite a career.

Not only is she the longest-reigning British monarch in history — she’s also the longest-reigning current monarch in the world, and the longest-serving current head of state. On Saturday, April 21, she turns 92 years old.

She’s the first UK monarch to ever celebrate a sapphire jubilee, which marked her 65-year reign in 2017. CNN reported that, should the queen still be reigning on February 6, 2022, she will be the first British monarch to celebrate a platinum jubilee.

Elizabeth was a favorite of her grandfather, King George V.

In “Queen and Country: The Fifty-year Reign of Elizabeth II,” biographer William Shawcross wrote that the monarch made for “a surprisingly playful figure” who loved to play games with his first female grandchild. British politician Winston Churchill also reportedly described her as “a character.”

The queen has at least two family nicknames — “Lilibet” and “cabbage.”

Shawcross wrote in Queen and Country: The Fifty-year Reign of Elizabeth II that her grandfather coined “Lilibet.” The family nickname also may have arisen from the way Queen Elizabeth II pronounced her own name as a small child.

Town and Country reported that the queen’s husband Prince Philip also may affectionately refer to her as “cabbage” — possibly a twist on the popular French pet name “mon petit chou,” which means both “my little cabbage” and “my little pastry puff.”

Elizabeth II reportedly made the first ever royal transatlantic telephone call in 1939.

The 13-year-old called her parents King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, who were touring Canada at the time, according toI Never Knew That About Royal Britain

Queen Elizabeth reportedly fell in love with Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark when she was 13.

Fifty Years the Queen: A Tribute to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on Her Golden Jubilee” biographers Arthur Bousfield and Garry Toffoli mark the summer of 1939 as the beginning of her romantic interest; the then-18-year-old Royal Navy midshipman escorted Elizabeth and her sister Margaret on a tour of the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth.

For her 1953 coronation, the queen’s coronation gown featured symbolic embroidery that reflected the Commonwealth at the time.

Biographer Robert Lacey wrote in “Monarch: The Life and Reign of Elizabeth II” that the dress featured the English rose, the Scottish thistle, the Irish shamrock, the Welsh leek, the Australian wattle, the Canadian maple leaf, the New Zealander silver fern, the South African protea, the Indian and Ceylonese lotus flowers, and the Pakistani jute.

The queen was the victim of one of the worst royal security breaches in modern history. 

On the night of July 9, 1982, she awoke to discover Michael Fagan in her bedroom, the BBC reported. Fagan had reportedly managed to dodge guards and electronic alarms, according to UPI. A security alarm that the queen pressed didn’t go off, as it wasn’t properly set up. A footman who had been out walking the queen’s corgis subsequently returned and subdued Fagan, according BBC.

The finances of Queen Elizabeth and her son and heir Prince Charles were scrutinized after their names appeared in the leaked Paradise Papers.

The leak revealed that millions of dollars from The Duchy of Lancaster and The Duchy of Cornwall — private estates belonging to the royals — had been invested offshore. Spokespeople from both duchies denied wrongdoing and pointed to the fact both royals voluntarily pay taxes on their incomes, Business Insider previously reported.

Up Next

See Gallery




Her career was recently fictionalized in the Netflix historical drama series “The Crown,” and the royal family is often in the news. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t a few facts out there about the queen that you might not have heard before.

Here’s a look at some surprising facts about Queen Elizabeth II.

RELATED: Leaders the queen has outlasted

United States President Dwight Eisenhower

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

French President Rene Coty

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Georgi Malenkov

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Nikita Khruschchev

(Photo via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan

(Photo by Terry Disney/Central Press/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Sir Anthony Eden

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

French President General Charles de Gaulle

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

United States President John F. Kennedy

(Photo via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Sir Alec Douglas-Home

(Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

United States President Lyndon B. Johnson

(Photo via Getty Images)

German Chancellor Ludwig Erhard

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Harold Wilson

(Photo by Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

German Chancellor Kurt-Georg Kiesinger

(Photo via Getty Images)

United States President Richard Nixon

(Photo via PA)

British Prime Minister Edward Heath

(Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

French President Pompidou

(Photo by J. Cuinieres/Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

German Chancellor Willy Brandt

(Photo by Mike Lawn/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

United States President Gerald Ford

(Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)

French President Valery Giscard d’Estaing

(Photo credit ARCHIVE/AFP/GettyImages)

German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt

(Photo by Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Leonid Ilich Brezhnev

(Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister James Callaghan

(Photo by David Ashdown/Keystone/Getty Images)

United States President Jimmy Carter

(Photo via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher

(Photo via Getty Images)

United States President Ronald Reagan

(Photo by Anwar Hussein/Getty Images)

French President Mitterrand

(Photo via PA)

German Chancellor Helmut Kohl

(Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images)

Russian Leader Yuri Vladimirovich Andropov

(Photo credit should read AFP/Getty Images)

Russian Leader Konstantin Chernenko

(Photo via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Gobrachev

(Photo by Peter Turnley via Getty Images)

United States President George H.W. Bush

(Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister John Major

(Photo by Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Boris Yeltsin

(Photo via TASS / Valentin Cheredintsev via Getty Images)

United States President Bill Clinton

(Photo credit should read GERRY PENNY/AFP/Getty Images)

French President Chirac

(Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images)

Prime Minister Tony Blair

(Photo by Pool Photograph/Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images)

German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder

(Photo credit JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)

Russian President Vladimir Putin

(Photo by Julian Herbert/Getty Images)

United States President George W. Bush

(Photo credit STEPHEN HIRD/AFP/Getty Images)

German Chancellor Angela Merkel

(Photo credit JOHN STILLWELL/AFP/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown

(Photo via PA)

French President Nicolas Sarkozy 

(Photo by EMPICS Entertainment/PA)

Russian Leader Dmitry Medvedev

(Photo by Anton NovoderezhkinTASS via Getty Images)

United States President Barack Obama

(Photo by Lewis Whyld – WPA Pool/Getty Images)

Prime Minister David Cameron

(Photo by John Stillwell/WPA Pool/Getty Images)

French President Francois Hollande

(Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Theresa May

(Photo by Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images)

United States President Donald Trump

(Photo by Molly Riley/Pool via Bloomberg/Getty Images)

Up Next

See Gallery




See Also:

SEE ALSO: Queen Elizabeth has a fortune worth over $500 million — here’s where the royal family got their riches

Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/lifestyle/2019/04/21/8-things-you-probably-never-knew-about-queen-elizabeth-ii/23417499/

8 things you probably never knew about Queen Elizabeth II

  • Queen Elizabeth II is the longest-lived and longest-reigning British monarch in history.
  • She’s ruled over the United Kingdom as a constitutional monarch since her 1953 coronation.
  • The queen and her family are frequently in the news — but there are some facts about Queen Elizabeth II that might fly under the radar.

Queen Elizabeth II has had quite a career.

Not only is she the longest-reigning British monarch in history — she’s also the longest-reigning current monarch in the world, and the longest-serving current head of state. On Saturday, April 21, she turns 92 years old.

She’s the first UK monarch to ever celebrate a sapphire jubilee, which marked her 65-year reign in 2017. CNN reported that, should the queen still be reigning on February 6, 2022, she will be the first British monarch to celebrate a platinum jubilee.

Elizabeth was a favorite of her grandfather, King George V.

In “Queen and Country: The Fifty-year Reign of Elizabeth II,” biographer William Shawcross wrote that the monarch made for “a surprisingly playful figure” who loved to play games with his first female grandchild. British politician Winston Churchill also reportedly described her as “a character.”

The queen has at least two family nicknames — “Lilibet” and “cabbage.”

Shawcross wrote in Queen and Country: The Fifty-year Reign of Elizabeth II that her grandfather coined “Lilibet.” The family nickname also may have arisen from the way Queen Elizabeth II pronounced her own name as a small child.

Town and Country reported that the queen’s husband Prince Philip also may affectionately refer to her as “cabbage” — possibly a twist on the popular French pet name “mon petit chou,” which means both “my little cabbage” and “my little pastry puff.”

Elizabeth II reportedly made the first ever royal transatlantic telephone call in 1939.

The 13-year-old called her parents King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, who were touring Canada at the time, according toI Never Knew That About Royal Britain

Queen Elizabeth reportedly fell in love with Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark when she was 13.

Fifty Years the Queen: A Tribute to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on Her Golden Jubilee” biographers Arthur Bousfield and Garry Toffoli mark the summer of 1939 as the beginning of her romantic interest; the then-18-year-old Royal Navy midshipman escorted Elizabeth and her sister Margaret on a tour of the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth.

For her 1953 coronation, the queen’s coronation gown featured symbolic embroidery that reflected the Commonwealth at the time.

Biographer Robert Lacey wrote in “Monarch: The Life and Reign of Elizabeth II” that the dress featured the English rose, the Scottish thistle, the Irish shamrock, the Welsh leek, the Australian wattle, the Canadian maple leaf, the New Zealander silver fern, the South African protea, the Indian and Ceylonese lotus flowers, and the Pakistani jute.

The queen was the victim of one of the worst royal security breaches in modern history. 

On the night of July 9, 1982, she awoke to discover Michael Fagan in her bedroom, the BBC reported. Fagan had reportedly managed to dodge guards and electronic alarms, according to UPI. A security alarm that the queen pressed didn’t go off, as it wasn’t properly set up. A footman who had been out walking the queen’s corgis subsequently returned and subdued Fagan, according BBC.

The finances of Queen Elizabeth and her son and heir Prince Charles were scrutinized after their names appeared in the leaked Paradise Papers.

The leak revealed that millions of dollars from The Duchy of Lancaster and The Duchy of Cornwall — private estates belonging to the royals — had been invested offshore. Spokespeople from both duchies denied wrongdoing and pointed to the fact both royals voluntarily pay taxes on their incomes, Business Insider previously reported.

Up Next

See Gallery




Her career was recently fictionalized in the Netflix historical drama series “The Crown,” and the royal family is often in the news. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t a few facts out there about the queen that you might not have heard before.

Here’s a look at some surprising facts about Queen Elizabeth II.

RELATED: Leaders the queen has outlasted

United States President Dwight Eisenhower

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

French President Rene Coty

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Georgi Malenkov

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Nikita Khruschchev

(Photo via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan

(Photo by Terry Disney/Central Press/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Sir Anthony Eden

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

French President General Charles de Gaulle

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

United States President John F. Kennedy

(Photo via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Sir Alec Douglas-Home

(Photo by Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

United States President Lyndon B. Johnson

(Photo via Getty Images)

German Chancellor Ludwig Erhard

(Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Harold Wilson

(Photo by Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

German Chancellor Kurt-Georg Kiesinger

(Photo via Getty Images)

United States President Richard Nixon

(Photo via PA)

British Prime Minister Edward Heath

(Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

French President Pompidou

(Photo by J. Cuinieres/Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

German Chancellor Willy Brandt

(Photo by Mike Lawn/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

United States President Gerald Ford

(Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)

French President Valery Giscard d’Estaing

(Photo credit ARCHIVE/AFP/GettyImages)

German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt

(Photo by Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Leonid Ilich Brezhnev

(Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister James Callaghan

(Photo by David Ashdown/Keystone/Getty Images)

United States President Jimmy Carter

(Photo via Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher

(Photo via Getty Images)

United States President Ronald Reagan

(Photo by Anwar Hussein/Getty Images)

French President Mitterrand

(Photo via PA)

German Chancellor Helmut Kohl

(Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images)

Russian Leader Yuri Vladimirovich Andropov

(Photo credit should read AFP/Getty Images)

Russian Leader Konstantin Chernenko

(Photo via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Gobrachev

(Photo by Peter Turnley via Getty Images)

United States President George H.W. Bush

(Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister John Major

(Photo by Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images)

Russian Leader Boris Yeltsin

(Photo via TASS / Valentin Cheredintsev via Getty Images)

United States President Bill Clinton

(Photo credit should read GERRY PENNY/AFP/Getty Images)

French President Chirac

(Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images)

Prime Minister Tony Blair

(Photo by Pool Photograph/Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images)

German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder

(Photo credit JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)

Russian President Vladimir Putin

(Photo by Julian Herbert/Getty Images)

United States President George W. Bush

(Photo credit STEPHEN HIRD/AFP/Getty Images)

German Chancellor Angela Merkel

(Photo credit JOHN STILLWELL/AFP/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown

(Photo via PA)

French President Nicolas Sarkozy 

(Photo by EMPICS Entertainment/PA)

Russian Leader Dmitry Medvedev

(Photo by Anton NovoderezhkinTASS via Getty Images)

United States President Barack Obama

(Photo by Lewis Whyld – WPA Pool/Getty Images)

Prime Minister David Cameron

(Photo by John Stillwell/WPA Pool/Getty Images)

French President Francois Hollande

(Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

British Prime Minister Theresa May

(Photo by Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Images)

United States President Donald Trump

(Photo by Molly Riley/Pool via Bloomberg/Getty Images)

Up Next

See Gallery




See Also:

SEE ALSO: Queen Elizabeth has a fortune worth over $500 million — here’s where the royal family got their riches

Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/lifestyle/2019/04/21/8-things-you-probably-never-knew-about-queen-elizabeth-ii/23417499/

WP Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com
Bunk Beds