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‘American Idol’ Season 4 Top 12 Finalists: Where are they now?

Ah, 2005. A year of chunky blonde highlights, the iPhone Nano, Myspace — and who could forget Season 4 of “American Idol”?

Before Carrie Underwood would become Hollywood’s chart-topping country-pop queen, she auditioned for the singing competition at just 21 years old. We all know how the story goes from there, but the journeys have been quite different for the rest of her fellow Top 12 finalists.

These fresh faces from well over a decade ago have been through a lot over the past 14 years. Here’s what they’re all up to now:

Carrie Underwood: THEN

Carrie Underwood: NOW

Nearly 15 years after taking the ‘Idol’ crown, she’s the bonafide queen of country music.

Bo Bice: NOW

Pretty crazy transformation! The rocker continues to make music and recently had a string of shows in Hawaii.

Jessica Sierra: NOW

After long-fought battles with drug and alcohol abuse, Jessica was eventually sentenced to a year in rehab. She now has a child of her own and speaks to kids about the dangers of substance abuse.

Mikalah Gordon: NOW

She has a standing gig every night singing at Las Vegas’ Cosmopolitan Hotel. She also created a web series based on her life, which premiered in 2017.

Anwar Robinson: NOW

The dreads are gone! He’s a music educator and creative arts advocate.

Constantine Maroulis: NOW

He’s snagged a number of leading Broadway roles, including the title role in “Jekyll and Hyde.”

Lindsey Cardinale: NOW

She still makes and performs new music.

Anthony Fedorov: THEN

Anthony Fedorov: NOW

How’s that for a makeover? He still makes music and is a proud father. 

Nadia Turner: NOW

So gorgeous! She continues to pursue her career in music.

Vonzell Solomon: NOW

The singer-songwriter was at this year’s Oscars, proving that you don’t need to win “American Idol” to end up on the red carpet.

Scott Savol: NOW

He’s mostly kept a low profile since the show.

Nikko Smith: NOW

Still killing the stage!

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Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/entertainment/2019/03/18/american-idol-season-4-top-12-finalists-where-are-they-now/22025496/

Innovative Designs, Inc. (IVDN: OTCQB) | OTCQB Certification

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Article source: http://www.otcmarkets.com/financialReportViewer?symbol=IVDN&id=213770

Selection committee doesn’t heed N.C. Central’s request to avoid Duke, Zion Williamson

On Saturday, North Carolina Central beat Norfolk State in the MEAC championship to earn a third straight NCAA tournament bid.

After the win, head coach LeVelle Moton immediately recognized his team’s likely fate as a No. 16 seed and had one request for the selection committee — anybody but Zion.

N.C. Central coach: Anybody but Zion

“Some coaches will say ‘We’ll take on anyone. We’ll be ready,’” Moton told reporters. “But I don’t want any part of playing Duke. Us playing against Zion [Williamson] would be like my 6-year-old son playing against me.”

[Best bracket wins $1M: Enter our Best Bracket Millionaire contest for free now!]

The selection committee did not heed his wish. The Eagles drew a First Four matchup against fellow No. 16 seed North Dakota State on Wednesday.

Their reward if they win? A matchup with the tournament’s No. 1 overall seed Duke in the East region.

No. 16 North Carolina Central: 9999/1 odds

Via Vegas Insider

(AP Photo/Jason Hirschfeld)

No. 16 Prairie View AM: 5000/1 odds

Via Vegas Insider

(AP Photo/Julie Bennett)

No. 16 North Dakota State: 5000/1 odds

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(AP Photo/Young Kwak)

No. 16 Gardner-Webb: 5000/1 odds

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No. 16 Fairleigh Dickinson: 5000/1 odds

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(AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

No. 15 Bradley: 5000/1 odds

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No. 15 Prairie View AM: 5000/1 odds

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(AP Photo/Michael Wyke)

No. 13 Vermont: 2000/1 odds

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No. 16 Iona: 2000/1 odds

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No. 15 Colgate: 2000/1 odds

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No. 14 Yale: 1000/1 odds

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No. 13 UC Irvine: 1000/1 odds

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No. 11 Temple: 1000/1 odds

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No. 11 Saint Mary’s: 1000/1 odds

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No. 13 Saint Louis: 1000/1 odds

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No. 11 St. John’s: 1000/1 odds

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No. 14 Old Dominion: 1000/1 odds

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No. 11 Ohio State: 1000/1 odds

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No. 14 Northern Kentucky: 1000/1 odds

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No. 13 Northeastern: 1000/1 odds

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No. 15 Montana: 1000/1 odds

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No. 12 Liberty: 1000/1 odds

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No. 14 Georgia State: 1000/1 odds

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No. 11 Belmont: 1000/1 odds

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No. 9 Baylor: 1000/1 odds

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No. 11 Arizona State: 1000/1 odds

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No. 9 Washington: 500/1 odds

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No. 8 VCU: 500/1 odds

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No. 8 Utah State: 500/1 odds

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No. 8 Ole Miss: 500/1 odds

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No. 9 Oklahoma: 500/1 odds

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No. 10 Minnesota: 500/1 odds

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No. 10 Seton Hall: 300/1 odds

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No. 12 New Mexico State: 300/1 odds

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No. 12 Murray State: 300/1 odds

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No. 9 UCF: 300/1 odds

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No. 6 Maryland: 250/1 odds

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No. 10 Maryland: 250/1 odds

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No. 7 Wofford: 200/1 odds

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No. 5 Mississippi State: 200/1 odds

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No. 10 Florida: 200/1 odds

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No. 12 Oregon: 150/1 odds

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No. 5 Wisconsin: 100/1 odds

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No. 7 Nevada: 100/1 odds

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No. 7 Louisville: 100/1 odds

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No. 7 Cincinnati: 100/1 odds

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No. 8 Syracuse: 85/1 odds

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No. 6 Buffalo: 85/1 odds

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No. 4 Virginia Tech: 80/1 odds

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(Matt Gentry/The Roanoke Times via AP)

No. 5 Marquette: 70/1 odds

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No. 4 Kansas State: 70/1 odds

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No. 4 Kansas: 60/1 odds

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No. 6 Villanova: 50/1 odds

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(Photo by Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

No. 3 LSU: 50/1 odds

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No. 5 Auburn: 50/1 odds

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No. 6 Iowa State: 40/1 odds

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(Photo by Scott Winters/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

No. 3 Purdue: 30/1 odds

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No. 3 Houston: 30/1 odds

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No. 4 Florida State: 30/1 odds

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No. 3 Texas Tech: 20/1 odds

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(AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

No. 2 Michigan: 18/1 odds

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(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

No. 2 Tennessee: 16/1 odds

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(Photo by Matthew Maxey/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

No. 2 Michigan State: 15/1 odds

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(Photo by Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

No. 2 Kentucky: 12/1 odds

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(Photo by Matthew Maxey/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

No. 1 Virginia: 8/1 odds

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No. 1 North Carolina: 6/1 odds

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No. 1 Gonzaga: 5/1 odds

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(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

No. 1 Duke: 11/5 odds

Via Vegas Insider

(AP Photo/Nell Redmond)

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Raasean Davis would have his hands full

The Eagles’ strength is in their frontcourt. Center Raasean Davis — 6-8 and 240 pounds — leads the team with 14.6 points, 8.9 rebounds and 1.2 blocks per game.

But he’s never seen anything close to the likes of Williamson in the MEAC. ACC opponents have never seen anything like Williamson.

A stacked North Carolina frontcourt gave up 50 points in the paint in Friday’s ACC tournament loss to Duke, the most the Tar Heels have allowed in the post in eight years, according to ESPN.

So, yeah. Odds are Zion will likely look like an adult playing against 6-year-olds whether Duke faces N.C. Central or Norfolk State this week.

But at least the Eagles can say they’re dancing.

More from Yahoo Sports:

 

Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/03/18/selection-committee-doesnt-heed-nc-centrals-request-to-avoid-duke-zion-williamson/23695266/

Teen who pushed girl off bridge pleads guilty to misdemeanor

A teenager accused of injuring her 16-year-old friend by pushing her off a 60-foot bridge in southwestern Washington in August pleaded guilty Monday to misdemeanor reckless endangerment.

Taylor Smith appeared in Clark County District Court, where a state prosecutor recommended no jail time. She will be sentenced on March 27.

Smith pushed Jordan Holgerson off the Moulton Falls Regional Park bridge northeast of Vancouver on Aug. 7. Holgerson suffered six broken ribs and punctured lungs.

Smith, 19, was charged with one count of reckless endangermentabout a week and a half after the incident, a misdemeanor which carries a maximum penalty of a year in jail and a $5,000 fine.

She pleaded not guilty in December. Last month, Smith was offered a plea deal, the details of which were not shared in court.

The 10-second video clip of the incident captured on a cellphone went viral.

Holgerson initially planned to jump off the bridge into a river about 60 feet below, but has said she changed her mind.

She said in a recent interview on NBC’s “Today” that while she was looking forward to Smith being sentenced, she was uncertain what punishment Smith should face.

“Some days, I kind of want her to be put in jail,” Holgerson said. “And some days, I think that might be too harsh.”

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Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/news/2019/03/18/teen-who-pushed-girl-off-bridge-pleads-guilty-to-misdemeanor/23695267/

Kylie Jenner and YouTuber David Dobrik surprise strangers at the mall

Over the weekend, Kylie Jenner teamed up with YouTube personality David Dobrik to give a few strangers quite the surprise. 

In a video posted to YouTube on Saturday, Jenner hides in the backseat as Dobrik gives rides to unsuspecting fans, who are quizzed about their Kardashian-Jenner knowledge, like which sister is their favorite and what they know about Jenner’s successful cosmetics brand

One fan reveals his favorite Kardashian sibling is Khloe only to find out Jenner is sitting behind him. “I was just about to say you were my favorite,” he says to uproarious laughter from Dobrik and Jenner.

Later, a young female fan freaks out when Dobrik tells her to congratulate Jenner on her success, only to discover the mogul is sitting behind her. “Bro, you f**king kidding me,” she exclaims as she covers her shocked face. “What the f**k!”

The video continues this way until one fan fumbles over his Jenner knowledge, much to Dobrik’s confusion. “Are we talking about the right Kylie?” he asks his passenger, who clarifies he’s indeed a fan of Jenner’s. 

When she finally pops up behind him, he tells Jenner she’s “f**king fire” and receives a hug from the superstar. 

Fans can’t seem to get enough of the surprises, with the video racking up over 6.3 million views and counting. Watch the full clip below. 

The playful video comes amid drama surrounding Jenner, who has been slow to rebuild her friendship with Jordyn Woods after it was revealed the Kardashian pal hooked up with Khloe Kardashian’s now-ex-boyfriend, Tristan Thompson. The revelation has caused a rift between the two longtime friends. 

A source previously told ET that the two friends “have communicated, but not much,” with Jenner “still figuring out where [Woods] fits into her life.” For more on that story, check out our full coverage below. 

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Article source: https://www.aol.com/article/entertainment/2019/03/18/kylie-jenner-and-youtuber-david-dobrik-surprise-strangers-at-the-mall/23695224/

Blue Ridge Real Estate Co. (BRRE: Pink Current) | Quarterly Report

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Article source: http://www.otcmarkets.com/financialReportViewer?symbol=BRRE&id=213766

This housing market clue predicts pending economic slowdown

When it comes to the health of the economy, the housing market is the canary in the coal mine, providing clear and early clues of pending trouble. And that’s why analysts track its performance intently, looking at a multitude of indicators that might signal the looming recession some are forecasting.

Now, one critical clue from the housing market has emerged to suggest economic growth is likely to backslide, and that is a steady decline in single-family authorizations.

In essence: Construction activity appears to be slowing.

Single-family housing authorizations – what some call a key predictor of economic recessions – represent building permits requesting permission to commence construction. In contrast, housing starts signal that construction has already begun. 

According to the latest data released by BuildFax, single-family housing authorizations fell for the third consecutive month in February, declining 4.24% from the previous month. This also represents a 5.75% decline year over year.

The data left BuildFax to conclude that, “without relief from this steady decline in single-family housing authorizations, an economic slowdown is likely forthcoming.”

Existing housing maintenance and remodeling volumes are also down, continuing a four-month decline. Maintenance volume was down 5.53% year over year, while remodeling volume was down 10.07%.

But at the same time, spend for both maintenance and remodeling increased, which BuildFax attributed to recent spikes in construction labor costs.

Interestingly, some cities are defying national trends, posting increases in new construction and maintenance in February.

Dallas, New York City, Chicago and Washington, D.C., saw activity in new construction and maintenance rise.

BuildFax said Chicago saw the greatest increases, with new construction up 60.15% and maintenance up 19.51%, which the report said could be a result of the city’s strategic five-year housing plan to solve affordability problems.

“It’s yet to be seen whether housing activity in these cities will eventually slow as it has on a national level or if these will be key metros to watch as the U.S. potentially heads towards an economic slowdown,” BuildFax wrote.

BuildFax CEO Holly Tachovsky said the performance of these indicators over the next several months will be key to determining the overall impact on the economy.

“There have been persistent declines across key housing indicators for four consecutive months. However, we anticipate some economic relief as we head into 2019’s spring home buying season,” Tachovsky said.

“Mortgage rates have reached recent lows leading to increased potential for home sales, which is oftentimes followed by a surge in remodeling activity,” she continued. “The performance of single-family housing authorizations, maintenance and remodeling activity through this next season will shed light on whether declines in the housing market will spread to the broader economy.”

Here is a map of new construction and maintenance activity in the 10 largest metros:

map

(Source: BuildFax)

Article source: https://www.housingwire.com/articles/48454-this-housing-market-clue-predicts-pending-economic-slowdown

PwC reaches $335 million settlement with FDIC over Taylor, Bean & Whitaker/Colonial Bank audits

PricewaterhouseCoopers will pay $335 million to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. in a settlement that ends claims that the auditor failed in its duties by not discovering the accounting malfeasance that led to the late-2000s collapse of Colonial Bank, which funded the mortgages originated by Taylor, Bean Whitaker.

Once upon a time, TBW was the largest privately held mortgage company in the country, employing more than 2,000 people. But TBW collapsed in 2009 after it was discovered that TBW Chairman Lee Farkas and others were cooking the books to cover for hundreds of millions of dollars in nonexistent mortgages.

PwC acted as the auditor for Colonial Bank, which also collapsed when the issues at TBW were uncovered.

When it failed, Colonial Bank was taken over by the FDIC, which then sued PwC and claimed that the bank’s failure cost the insurer $5 billion, making it one of the country’s largest ever bank failures.

Eventually, a federal judge ruled that PwC was “negligent” in its role as Colonial Bank’s auditor, stating that the company could have done more to prevent Colonial’s collapse.

And last year, the judge ordered PwC to pay more than $625 million for its actions in the Colonial/TBW matter.

But, late last week, the two sides announced that they’d reached a settlement in the matter that will see PwC pay $335 million to the FDIC for its role in the TBW affair.

That amount is much closer to the $306.75 million that PwC originally contended it should pay the FDIC, rather than the $625 million awarded to the agency by District Judge Barbara Jacobs Rothstein.

And the FDIC agreed to the settlement over the objections of former FDIC Chair Martin Gruenberg, who still serves on the FDIC board of directors.

Gruenberg issued a statement through the FDIC, in which he stated that he did not vote to approve the settlement because the settlement did not require PwC to admit liability in the matter.

“As a result of its failure to follow required auditing standards, PwC did not detect that hundreds of millions of dollars of assets claimed by Colonial did not in fact exist, had been sold to others, or were worthless. If PwC had complied with auditing standards, it would have discovered the fraud, the fraud would have been stopped, and the damages to Colonial Bank would have been limited,” Gruenberg said in his statement.

“As noted, the settlement announced today did not include a written admission of liability by PwC,” Gruenberg added. “Given PwC’s professional negligence, which contributed directly to the failure of Colonial Bank and large losses to the Deposit Insurance Fund, I voted against authorizing the settlement without a written admission of liability by PwC.”

Nevertheless, the FDIC agreed to the settlement.

“PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as Receiver for Colonial Bank have settled professional negligence claims brought by the FDIC-R against PwC to their mutual satisfaction,” a spokesperson for PwC said in a statement.

According to Rothstein, PwC was negligent in its audits of Colonial Bank’s business in 2003, 2004, 2005, and 2008. Rothstein ruled that PwC’s audits were not designed to detect fraud and did not fully inspect Colonial’s business in the relevant years.

According to Rothstein, PwC did not inspect any of TBW’s loan files at Colonial in 2003 or 2004, failed to follow up on the “illogical” dates on Colonial’s financial reports, failed inspect any of the supposed collateral backing the mortgages in question, and neglected to follow-up on sample loans that failed quality control checks.

TBW is one of housing crisis’ most notorious collapses.

Beginning in 2002 and stretching to 2009, Farkas and his fellow conspirators swept funds between accounts at Colonial and Ocala Funding, a TBW subsidiary that also provided funding for TBW’s mortgages to cover constant overdrafts.

By December 2003, the rolling overdraft had grown to more than $120 million and sweeping the funds back and forth became too complex, so Farkas and others began selling mortgages that didn’t exist to cover the shortages.

By 2009, Colonial Bank had more than $500 million in nonexistent loans on its books.

TBW also sold loans to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. In 2002, loans sold to Fannie represented 85% of TBW’s business, but Fannie Mae canceled its seller/servicer agreement with TBW after it learned that Farkas had personally taken out $2 million in loans that were not actually backed by homes or any other eligible collateral to pay for the buybacks on non-compliant loans that TBW sold to Fannie.

In fact, Farkas planned to sell eight fraudulent loans (totaling $2 million) to Fannie to cover the money he needed pay Fannie for other non-compliant loans.

Fannie Mae discovered this fraud when Farkas was unable to make payments on the eight fraudulent loans, but did not communicate its findings to Freddie Mac, its regulator or other interested parties.

Subsequently, Freddie considerably increased the volume of its business with TBW.

Farkas’ schemes were finally discovered when Colonial, which was on the verge of insolvency, applied for $553 million in funding from the Troubled Asset Relief Program.

According to a 2014 report from the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s Office of the Inspector General, Farkas planned to use TBW to invest $150 million in Colonial and help raise the additional $150 million because he knew that without the injection of funding, TBW’s massive fraud would be discovered.

The additional $150 million wound end up being diverted from Ocala’s books to Colonial’s, but the entire nature of Colonial’s fundraising raised a red flag with the Special Inspector General for TARP.

Investigators questioned whether the injection of funding from Farkas was a “round trip” transaction, where the $300 million from TBW would be paid back from the TARP funds.

In the process of the investigation, several of Farkas’ co-conspirators eventually revealed the details of the multi-year, multi-billion dollar fraud.

Farkas eventually received a 30-year prison sentence and was ordered to forfeit $38.5 million in ill-gotten gains for the $2.9 billion scheme after he was found guilty on 14 counts of bank, wire and securities fraud, becoming one of the only people actually jailed for financial crimes in the run-up to the housing crisis.

And this isn’t the first time that PwC has been forced to pay up over its role in the TBW collapse. Back in August 2016, the auditor settled a $5.5 billion lawsuit over the same issue.

For much more on the fall of TBW, click here.

Article source: https://www.housingwire.com/articles/48456-pwc-reaches-335-million-settlement-with-fdic-over-taylor-bean-whitakercolonial-bank-audits

Your Money: State taxes are too hard for mere mortals to compute

NEW YORK(Reuters) – Can regular people calculate their state taxes in light of the new U.S. tax law?

No way, experts say.

“There isn’t a way to figure it out,” said Craig Smalley, an enrolled agent tax preparer in Orlando, Florida. “I’ve worked with clients all over the United States. There’s nothing you can do.”

But surely, users of do-it-yourself software can get a little window into what is going on?

TurboTax’s answer is that you need not know the intricacies of state law. The software “automatically imports your information into your state tax return from your federal tax return,” explained Lisa Greene-Lewis, a CPA and tax expert with TurboTax.

The Tax Cuts Jobs Act passed in December 2017 has already created a particularly challenging tax year. But situations in the 44 states that levy income tax are even more confusing.

Some states are following federal rules, but others like New York have broken ranks. Some, like New Jersey, have never been on board.

Virginia may be the winner for the most complicated taxes, according to Tynisa Gaines, an enrolled agent tax preparer based in Herndon, Virginia. It is among those states that say if you take the standard deduction on the federal return, you cannot itemize on your state return.

Since federal changes doubled the standard deduction to $12,000 for singles and $24,000 for married couples, fewer taxpayers are expected to itemize than before. But Virginia’s standard deduction is low, just $3,000 for singles and $6,000 for married.

Gaines said she would pay $1,000 more in state taxes if she did not itemize. She runs returns multiple ways to figure out the least painful options for her clients.

Keeping up with changes for her nationwide clientele requires constant attention. The only way Gaines manages is to download the regulation handbook from each state’s tax information website and pore over it.

“It’s not easy. I have to look it up for almost every client every year,” Gaines said. “A state might decide not to tax veteran retirement pay when they did before, or they might exempt military spouse pay suddenly. There is no shortcut to it at all.”

Even in a small state like Massachusetts, tax law can send professionals into a tizzy. The state conforms to federal law on issues like 529 college saving plan rules, but not on others like the tax treatment of debt cancellations, said John Warren, an enrolled agent tax preparer in Medford, Massachusetts.

“If I call up my tax software company, it’s most likely on the state side,” Warren said.

WITHHOLDING ISSUES

One reason you cannot just let the software figure it out is that the state takes out money from each of your paychecks. It is likely that the amount withheld in 2018 was incorrect and carried over to this year.

Even if you did projections, those may be obsolete. Enrolled agent Phyllis Jo Kubey did an analysis for each of New York clients, but the state later announced it would decouple from the federal rules.

New York still allows $1,000 per dependent personal exemption, for instance. “So if you just say, I’m going to use the standard deduction and not think about it, you might be leaving money on the table,” Kubey said.

Some state tax websites have withholding calculators, and you can navigate through the inputs – which, like the federal W-4 calculator, now require a lot of information.

You can also use your completed 2018 return as a baseline. Take your total state taxes due and then figure out the filing status and number of allowances that will equal the correct amount for 2019, divided by the number of paychecks you get for the rest of the year.

“The state is the stepchild. People forget about the state until the end,” Gaines said.

Editing by Lauren Young and Richard Chang

Article source: http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/news/wealth/~3/R2gNhOaIROA/your-money-state-taxes-are-too-hard-for-mere-mortals-to-compute-idUSKCN1QI4H3

Role of a Lifetime: Life Lessons with Peter Krause

NEW YORK (Reuters) – If you are looking for steady work, it is probably best not to go into show business. Unless you are Peter Krause, that is.

The 53-year-old Minnesota native has been a staple of U.S. TV screens for years, with roles in shows like “Sports Night,” “Six Feet Under,” “Parenthood,” and his current series “9-1-1,” which begins its spring season tonight on Fox.

For the latest in Reuters’ “Life Lessons” series, Krause talked with us about the heartland principles that have kept him working steadily in Hollywood for a couple of decades.

Q: Was an acting career always on your radar, even as a kid?

A: When I turned 16 in Roseville, Minnesota, it was expected that I would get a job, so I got one at the local movie theater.

It’s gone now, which is kind of sad. But I got to see every movie that came out, multiple times: Films like “The Mission,” “Chariots of Fire,” “On Golden Pond,” and “The Pope of Greenwich Village.”

So I got to really study those performances, even though I wasn’t thinking about being an actor at the time.

Q: Did your folks give you a hard time about your career choice?

A: My dad was a farm kid, always doing chores, who didn’t even have plumbing or electricity until he was 16. By the time he was 18, he was boots on the ground in Germany, as part of the army of occupation after World War Two. So the idea of acting was very foreign to him. We had a bit of a battle at first.

Q: What was the money situation like early on?

A: My parents didn’t have a lot of money. All of our family vacations were by car. So when I flew into New York City to go to New York University, I had never even been on a plane before.

I took the bus from LaGuardia Airport to Grand Central Station, and then walked from there down to NYU, which was about 40 blocks. Seeing the city like that was a shock to the system, since I had grown up in a small town in the middle of cornfields.

Q: Were those early acting years tough financially?

A: I had been bartending on Broadway in theaters, which is where I first met Aaron Sorkin, who was a bar manager at the Palace Theatre at the time, when they were playing “La Cage aux Folles.”

But one of my first shows out of college was with Carol Burnett, which was helpful with my parents, because they knew who she was. I finally got to take my dad out for lunch, and grabbed the check and signed the bill. He looked at me and said, “Well, this is different.”

Q: Which of your roles taught you the most?

A: All roles teach you something new. Different characters have different life rules, and some of those characters end up bleeding into me a little.

Nate Fisher from “Six Feet Under” was very difficult to play, because he was so at odds with himself all the time. That was a defining moment in my career. Working on that show was like a daily meditation on life and death.

Q: Have you thought about the future, and what retirement is going to look like for you?

A: I don’t plan on retiring. I’ll do this as long as I can. I still enjoy acting as much as I ever did. Right now on “9-1-1” I get to be a firefighter, which is basically my childhood dream come true.

Q: You have a kid, so what life lessons do you try to pass along to him?

A: He just turned 17, so I have taught him all sorts of things: How to ride a bike, drive a car. I was even his baseball coach for three years. What I have tried to impart to him the most is to figure out what makes him happy. For myself, I spent a fair amount of time trying to make my parents happy, and wanting to be a success in their eyes. That kind of messed me up. So I want to get my son to listen to his own compass.

(The writer is a Reuters contributor. The opinions expressed are his own.)

Editing by Beth Pinsker; Editing by David Gregorio

Article source: http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/news/wealth/~3/IdxlrtcwkEA/role-of-a-lifetime-life-lessons-with-peter-krause-idUSKCN1QZ14Z

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