NASA releases breathtaking close-up images of Saturn’s rings

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By Nick Cardona, Buzz60

The mysterious depths of space can now be seen in breathtaking clarity!

NASA released up-close images of Saturn’s rings.

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft sent back images looking over the shoulder of Saturn’s rings.

See more on Saturn’s rings:

Three of Saturn’s moons, Tethys, Enceladus and Mimas, taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on December 3, 2015 is shown in this NASA image released on February 22, 2016. Tethys (660 miles or 1,062 kilometers across) appears above the rings, while Enceladus (313 miles or 504 kilometers across) sits just below center. Mimas (246 miles or 396 kilometers across) hangs below and to the left of Enceladus. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/Handout FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

A natural-color image of Saturn from space, the first in which Saturn, its moons and rings, and Earth, Venus and Mars, all are visible, is seen in this NASA handout taken from the Cassini spacecraft July 19, 2013 and released November 12, 2013. The image captures 404,880 miles (651,591 kilometers) across Saturn and its inner ring system, including all of Saturn’s rings out to the E ring, which is Saturn’s second outermost ring. Cassini’s imaging team processed 141 wide-angle images to create the panorama. REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI/Handout via Reuters (OUTER SPACE – Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) ATTENTION EDITORS – THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

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No telescope on this planet would ever have been able to see this.

Cassini left Earth in 1997 and, in its nearly two decades of exploration, has sent home remarkable images of our corner of the universe.

In April of last year, Cassini spent 44 hours staring at Saturn’s atmosphere and capturing in-depth images.

The mission to Saturn is a joint venture between NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency.

The spacecraft will be intentionally crashed into Saturn in September for safety reasons.

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