Trump is reportedly ‘saving’ a seat on the Supreme Court for conservative Amy Barrett in place of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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  • President Donald Trump is “saving” a seat on the US Supreme Court bench for judge Amy Barrett in place of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg,Axios reported on Sunday.
  • Still, Trump may not get another Supreme Court pick, despite his desire to fill the bench with a reliable conservative majority.
  • Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has stated she plans to remain a justice for “at least five more years” and appears in good health despite recent health concerns.

President Donald Trump is “saving” a seat on the US Supreme Court bench for judge Amy Barrett in place of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg,Axios reported on Sunday.

Three sources, who are familiar with comments made by the president in private, told Axios that Trump said he was “saving her for Ginsburg,” alluding to giving Barrett a seat on the bench should Ginsburg step down.

The 47-year-old judge was originallyshortlisted by Trump for the Supreme Court seat vacated by retired Justice Anthony Kennedy in 2018. The report noted Barrett was a favorite at the time among conservative activists.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, stands in her chambers following an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Aug. 23, 2013. Ginsburg, 80, the oldest member of the Supreme Court and appointed to the court in 1993 by Democratic President Bill Clinton, has said on several occasions that she wants to match the longevity of Justice Louis Brandeis, who was 82 when he stepped down in 1939. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, looks out the window of her chambers following an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Aug. 23, 2013. Ginsburg, 80, the oldest member of the Supreme Court and appointed to the court in 1993 by Democratic President Bill Clinton, has said on several occasions that she wants to match the longevity of Justice Louis Brandeis, who was 82 when he stepped down in 1939. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

WASHINGTON, DC – FEBRUARY 12: Members of the Supreme Court, (L-R) Chief Justice John Roberts and associate justices Anthony Kennendy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, John Paul Stevens, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, applaud as U.S. President Barack Obama arrives to deliver his State of the Union speech before a joint session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol February 12, 2013 in Washington, DC. Facing a divided Congress, Obama focused his speech on new initiatives designed to stimulate the U.S. economy and said, ‘ItÕs not a bigger government we need, but a smarter government that sets priorities and invests in broad-based growth’. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON – SEPTEMBER 29: Members of the US Supreme Court pose for a group photograph at the Supreme Court building on September 29, 2009 in Washington, DC. Front row (L-R): Associate Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, Associate Justice John Paul Stevens, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Antonin Scalia, and Associate Justice Clarence Thomas. Back Row (L-R), Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr., Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, and Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

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Trump’s pick Brett Kavanaugh was ultimately nominated and confirmed to the Supreme Court in place of Kennedy, a decision which prompted scrutiny considering his previous writings concerning abortion access and multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.

Barrett, who was successfully nominated by Trump in 2017 to serve as a judge on the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, has beencriticized by Democrats in the past for her conservative views, particularly around abortion

As a professor at Notre Dame, Barrett belonged to the University Faculty for Life until 2016, which promotes anti-abortion resource, according to her judicial questionnaire. She also expressed her views on abortion in a university magazine in 2013 describing her own conviction that “life begins at conception,” and has previously written on the possibility of reexamining the landmark Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade.

During hertense confirmation hearing for the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals in 2017, democratic senators grilled Barrett on how her Catholic faith could impact her judgment.

“The dogma lives loudly within you,” Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) notoriouslysaid during Barrett’s hearing. “That’s of concern.”

However, Barrett defended her personal views, saying she would “never impose” her own convictions on the law.

Despite Trump’s apparent desire to have Barrett on the Supreme Court bench and to hold a reliable conservative majority, it’s unlikely he’ll get another pick. Ginsburg, who is 85 years old, has stated she plans to remain a justice for “at least five more years” and appears in good health in light of recent health concerns.

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