On Trump’s second day, thousands of women to march in D.C. in protest

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WASHINGTON, Jan 21 (Reuters) – Hundreds of thousands of people from all over the United States are expected to pack into downtown Washington on Saturday for a women’s march in opposition to the agenda and rhetoric of President Donald Trump.

The Women’s March on Washington, featuring speakers, celebrity appearances and a protest walk along the National Mall, was planned as a counter-argument to Trump’s populist presidential campaign, in which he angered many on the left with comments seen as demeaning to women, Mexicans and Muslims.

SEE ALSO: Timeline: The women’s rights movement in the US

It comes the day after the nation’s capital was rocked by violent protest against Trump, with black-clad anti-establishment activists smashing windows, setting vehicles on fire and fighting with riot-gear-clad police who responded with stun grenades.

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A limousine burns after being smashed by anti-Trump protesters on K Street on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. While protests were mostly peaceful, some turned violent. President-elect Donald Trump was sworn-in as the 45th U.S. President today.

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Protesters block a street after the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017, in Washington, DC.

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Protesters clash with police after the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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A woman helps a protester after he was sprayed with pepper spray during protest near the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Michael Moore speaks to protesters at McPherson Square Park following the inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Today Trump became the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

Protesters clash with police during the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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A man protests the Presidential Inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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A police officer tries to tackle a protester demonstrating against U.S. President Donald Trump on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Adrees Latif)

An activist stands amid smoke from a stun grenade while protesting against U.S. President Donald Trump on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, D.C. January 20, 2017.

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Protesters chain themselves to each other and block an entry point prior at the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Firefighters extinguish a car that was set on fire during protests near the inauguration of President Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Protesters demonstrating against U.S. President Donald Trump raise their hands as they are surrounded by police on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

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Protesters clash with police while demonstrating against U.S. President Donald Trump on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Adrees Latif)

A protestor dressed as Uncle Sam attends Donald Trump’s Inauguration ceremony on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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Police run as they confront protesters during the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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Protesters are surrounded by police during a protest near the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

A protester is assisted by police after being injured during protests near the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Protesters chain themselves to an entry point prior at the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, DC, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

Demonstrators protest following the inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Today Trump became the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

An anti-Trump protester screams after being hit by a paintball gun fired by Police during clashes in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107. Masked, black-clad protesters carrying anarchist flags smashed windows and scuffled with riot police Friday in downtown Washington, blocks away from the route of the parade in honor of newly sworn-in President Donald Trump. Washington police arrested more than 90 people over acts of vandalism committed on the fringe of peaceful citywide demonstrations being held against Trump’s inauguration.

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Police and demonstrators clash in downtown Washington after a limo was set on fire following the inauguration of President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Washington and the entire world have watched the transfer of the United States presidency from Barack Obama to Donald Trump, the 45th president.

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Police stop protesters from passing through following the inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Today Trump became the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

Demonstrators protest following the inauguration of Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Today Trump became the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)

A man looks through a smashed car window during a protest against the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Demonstrators set fires as they confront police in protest against the inauguration of US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Protesters attend Donald Trump’s Inauguration ceremony on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(Photo by Amanda Edwards/WireImage)

A man holds a sign in front of riot police during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump on the sidelines of the inauguration in Washington, D.C. January 20, 2017.

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The protests illustrated the depth of the anger in a deeply divided country that is still recovering from the scarring 2016 campaign season. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton, the first woman nominated for president by a major U.S. party.

The organizers of Saturday’s march said they had extensive security plans in place, and would have both visible and hard-to-spot security workers along the route.

The event, the brainchild of Hawaiian grandmother Teresa Shook, was intended as an outlet for women and men who consider themselves feminists to vent their frustration and anxiety over Trump’s victory. It spotlights the fierce opposition Trump faces as he takes office, a period that is typically more of a honeymoon than a hatefest.

A recent ABC News/Washington Post poll found Trump had the lowest favorability rating of any incoming president since the 1970s.

Women reached by Reuters gave a host of reasons for marching, ranging from inspiring other women to run for office to protesting Trump’s plans to repeal the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which among other things requires health insurers to cover birth control.

Tea Party Patriots supporters hold signs protesting the Affordable Care Act in front of the Supreme Court as the court hears arguments on the health care reform bill on Tuesday, March 27, 2012.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Affordable Care Act supporters wave signs outside the Supreme Court after the court upheld court’s Obamacare on Thursday, June 25, 2015.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A man holds signs during a protest on the second day of oral arguments for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building on March 27, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today is the second of three days the high court has set aside to hear six hours of arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

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Sister Caroline attends a rally with other supporters of religious freedom to praise the Supreme Court’s decision in the Hobby Lobby, contraception coverage requirement case on June 30, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby, which operates a chain of arts-and-craft stores, challenged the provision and the high court ruled 5-4 that requiring family-owned corporations to pay for insurance coverage for contraception under the Affordable Care Act violated a federal law protecting religious freedom.

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An Obamacare supporter counter protests a Tea Party rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in the morning hours of March 27, 2012 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court continued to hear oral arguments on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

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Affordable Care Act supporters hold up signs outside the Supreme Court as they wait for the court’s decision on Obamacare on Thursday, June 25, 2015.

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Ron Kirby holds a sign while marching in protest of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

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A protester waves his bible in the air as he overpowered by cheers from supporters of the Affordable Care Act as they celebrate the opinion for health care outside of the Supreme Court in Washington,Thursday June 25, 2015. The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.

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Nuns, who are opposed to the Affordable Care Act’s contraception mandate, and other supporters rally outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, March 23, 2016. On Wednesday morning, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral arguments in Zubik v. Burwell, a consolidated case brought by religious groups challenging a process for opting out of the Affordable Care Act’s contraception mandate.

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Supporters of contraception rally before Zubik v. Burwell, an appeal brought by Christian groups demanding full exemption from the requirement to provide insurance covering contraception under the Affordable Care Act, is heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington March 23, 2016.

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Protestors hold placards challenging ‘Obamacare’ outside of the US Supreme Court on March 4, 2015 in Washington, DC. The US Supreme Court heard a second challenge to US President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act. The US Supreme Court faces a momentous case Wednesday on the sweeping health insurance reform law that President Barack Obama wants to leave as part of his legacy. The question before the court is whether the seven million people or more who subscribed via the government’s website can obtain tax subsidies that make the coverage affordable. A ruling is expected in June.

(MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

 Linda Door (L) protests against President Obama’s health care plan in front of the U.S. Supreme Court Building on March 26, 2012 in Washington, DC. Today the high court, which has set aside six hours over three days, will hear arguments over the constitutionality President Barack Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act celebrate after the Supreme Court up held the law in the 6-3 vote at the Supreme Court in Washington June 25, 2015. The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide availability of tax subsidies that are crucial to the implementation of President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law, handing a major victory to the president.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

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Overall, the women said they hoped to send a unity message to Trump after a campaign in which he said Mexican immigrants were “rapists,” discussed banning Muslims from entering the United States, and was revealed to have once bragged about grabbing women by the genitals and kissing them without permission.

“It’s a lot of things: To protest the administration that’s coming in and the blatant disrespect for women and people of color,” said Whitney Jordan, 28, who works in retail in New York and said she was coming to Washington on a bus organized by Planned Parenthood, the reproductive health organization that is the march’s biggest sponsor.

Another march participant, Carli Baklashev, a stay-at-home mother of five boys from Missouri, said, “I want to resist the ideology of everything that he stands for and teach my children that, you know, love, empathy and inclusion and diversity are a staple of who we are.

Trump’s team did not respond to a request for comment about the march.

During his inauguration speech on Friday, Trump vowed to work for the good of the U.S. worker, saying, “Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs, will be made to benefit American workers and American families.”

U.S. President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and son Barron walk during the inaugural parade from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Pool)

Washington D.C. motorcycle police lead the inaugural parade for U.S. President Donald Trump after he was sworn in at the Capitol (background) in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

U.S. President Donald Trump (R) waves to supporters as he walks the parade route with first lady Melania Trump during the Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Donald J. Trump was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

The family of US President Donald Trump arrives at the reviewing stand at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107 following swearing-in ceremonies on Capitol Hill earlier today. From (L-R): son Barron, son Eric and wife Lara, daughters Ivanka and Tiffany and daughter-in-law Vanessa (extreme R).

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Newly inaugurated U.S. Vice President Mike Pence looks out the window of his limousine during the inauguration parade in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

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The U.S. Army band “Pershing’s Own” marches in the parade carrying U.S. President Donald Trump following his inauguration in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

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U.S. President Donald Trump waves as he and his wife Melania walk during the inaugural Parade in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in earlier as the 45th President of the United States.

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U.S. President Donald Trump waves from inside his limousine as he participates in the inaugural parade after his swearing in at the Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Ivanka Trump walks with her son Theo during the inaugural parade in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107.� US President Donald Trump on Friday stepped out of his limousine along the inaugural parade route, briefly walking on Pennsylvania Avenue and waving to supporters with his wife Melania and young son Barron. Earlier, the president drove past a crowd of protesters chanting anti-Trump slogans and waving banners.

(DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and son Barron walk during the inaugural parade from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Pool)

US President Donald Trump stands with First Lady Melania Trump at the Capitol Building before departing for the parade after Trump is sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/John Angelillo/Pool)

Supporters cheer as the presidential limousine drives up Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House surrounded by security detail after inauguration ceremonies for US President Donald Trump on January 20, 2017 in Washington,

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump waves to supporters as he walks the parade route with first lady Melania Trump and son Barron Trump past the main reviewing stand in front of the White House during the Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Donald J. Trump was sworn in today as the 45th president of the United States.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump walks his wife Melania surrounded by Secret Service officers outside the White House as the presidential inaugural parade winds through the nation’s capital on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Marchers take part in the inaugural parade of U.S. President Donald Trump in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in as 45th President of the United States.

(REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

The family of US President Donald Trump arrives at the reviewing stand at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2107 following swearing-in ceremonies on Capitol Hill earlier today. From (L-R): First Lady Melania Trump, son Barron, son Eric and wife Lara, daughters Ivanka and Tiffany and daughter-in-law Vanessa (extreme R).

(JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. President Donald Trump’s Housing and Urban Development Secretary nominee Ben Carson arrives to take his seat for the inaugural parade in Washington, January 20, 2017. Donald Trump was sworn in as 45th President of the United States.

(REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

US Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen wave as they arrive in front of the White House for the presidential inaugural parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Former Texas Governor Rick Perry arrives for the presidential inaugural parade in front of the White House on January 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

A view of atmosphere at the Presidential Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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Participants march in period costume during the inaugural parade following U.S. President Donald Trump’s swearing in at the Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Newly inaugurated U.S. President Donald Trump salutes as he presides over a military parade during Trump’s swearing ceremony in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017.

(REUTERS/Mike Segar)

A view of atmosphere at the Presidential Inaugural Parade on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC.

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US Defense Secretary nominee James Mattis arrives for the presidential inaugural parade in front of the White House on January 20, 2017, in Washington, DC. Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the Uniited States.

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Celebrities such as the musicians Janelle Monae and Katy Perry – both of whom supported Clinton in the election – are expected to take part in Saturday’s march. Women have knitted pink cat-eared “pussy” hats, a reference to Trump’s claim in the 2005 video that was made public weeks before the election that he grabbed women by the genitals.

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Dozens of groups representing myriad issues joined together to sponsor the march.

Shannon Watts, the head of pro-gun control group Moms Demand Action, said her organization will send more than 100 marchers.

“Gun violence is a women’s issue,” Watts said. She said women in the United States are 16 times more likely to be the victim of gun violence than in other high-income nations and that studies have found 4.5 million women have been threatened at some point with a gun.

Groups including Emily’s List, which supports Democratic women candidates, said the election had already spurred increased turnout at classes to train women to mount campaigns for mostly low-level political offices.

“I want it to be energizing,” Erica Eisdorfer, 59, of Carrboro, North Carolina, said of the march. “Nothing is going to change on Sunday morning, nothing will have changed … but I think the people who wish it were other will be energized.” (Reporting by Emily Stephenson and Ginger Gibson; Editing by Leslie Adler)

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