Rates Are Back to Lowest Levels in More Than a Year

News

Mortgage rates fell again today as mortgage lenders got caught up with yesterday’s market movements.  Mortgage rates are based on bond market trading levels, but mortgage lenders only adjust rates once per day unless there’s quite a bit of movement.  Yesterday saw such movement, and in those cases, lenders typically adjust rates to reflect only part of the overall shift in markets until the shift is confirmed for a certain amount of time.  As such, when bond markets began the day in similar territory to yesterday, lenders were able to bring mortgage rates even lower than yesterday.

With that, the average lender is back to the lowest rates in more than a year.  It should be noted that several lenders are still a bit higher than they were on March 27th and 28th of this year.  Other lenders are in noticeably better shape, however.  In outright terms, that means rate quotes of 4.125% are common, 4.0% is not uncommon, and 3.875% is possible for the most flawless scenarios–especially in cases where borrowers are willing to pay a bit more in upfront closing costs to buy down the rate.

Markets closed early today and will be fully closed on Monday for Memorial Day.  Interest rate volatility should increase steadily after that, with the first week of June bringing the biggest risks/opportunities. 


Loan Originator Perspective

Bond markets slumbered into the Memorial Day weekend, closing early near unchanged levels.  My pricing improved slightly from Thursday’s.  With lock desks closing early for the holiday, I’m floating new applications until (at least) Tuesday.  Thanks to all those who’ve served this great county.-Ted Rood, Senior Originator

Today’s Most Prevalent Rates

  • 30YR FIXED – 4.0-4.125%
  • FHA/VA – 4.0%
  • 15 YEAR FIXED – 3.875% 
  • 5 YEAR ARMS –  3.875-4.25% depending on the lender


Ongoing Lock/Float Considerations
 

  • Early 2019 saw a rapid reevaluation of big-picture trends in rates and in markets in general

  • The Federal Reserve has been a key player, and while they aren’t the ones pulling the global economic strings, their response to the economy has helped rates fall more quickly than they otherwise might.

  • Based on the Fed’s laundry list of concerns, the bond market (which determines rates) will be watching economic data closely, both at home and abroad.  The stronger the data, the more rates could rise, while weaker data could lead to new long-term lows.  
  • Rates discussed refer to the most frequently-quoted, conforming, conventional 30yr fixed rate for top tier borrowers among average to well-priced lenders.  The rates generally assume little-to-no origination or discount except as noted when applicable.  Rates appearing on this page are “effective rates” that take day-to-day changes in upfront costs into consideration.

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